• Free Bids! 509.943.7032

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    Top Tree Service LLC serves the Tri-Cities and surrounding areas, including Richland, Kennewick, Pasco, Burbank, Ellensburg, Benton City, and Wenatchee. Call 509.943.7032 for your FREE estimate today! When you contact Top Tree Service LLC, we will schedule an appointment for an arborist to meet with you and do a walk through of your property. This allows us to discuss and address the health and safety of your trees as well as answer any questions that you might have.
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  • Knowledge and Experience

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    Ryan Hone and Top Tree Service LLC have been serving the Tri-Cities and surrounding areas since 2004. They have all of the necessary knowledge, training, and equipment to properly care for your trees. Safety is a priority for both your property and our employees.
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  • What We Do

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    At Top Tree Service LLC, we have made it our mission to practice quality tree care work with an emphasis on proper pruning to ISA standards. Trees are valuable natural resources, to both the community and to our customers. We do everything that we can to help maintain those resources in a cost effective way that benefits our customers, their property, and the trees.
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We’re good at it.

  • We’ve been working with trees for a long time. Our team has over 25 years of combined experience.
  • We have the experience, the training, and the tools.
  • We know the Mid-Columbia area and climate, and what helps trees here thrive.
  • We clean up afterwards. You won’t find a mess when we are through.

We know trees.

      • We live here and know the soil and climate
      • We are trained
      • Experienced
      • Fully equipped
      • ISA certified
      • Insure

        We care.STOP topping trees!

        • DO NOT “top” your trees. We know how to prune trees properly to ensure their health, protect their value, and keep them beautiful for years to come.
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Protect your property from wildfires.

  • Clear away dead leaves and brush. Remove all dead leaves and needles from the roof, gutters, and yard.
  • Remove low-hanging limbs from trees, raising the canopy to 6′ off the ground.
  • Remove branches overhanging the roof or coming within 10′ of a chimney.
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We are in the middle of a beautiful summer season and this is when we see more and more people out in their yards taking care of their trees, shrubs, and other greenery. We think it’s a good time to go over some “best practices when it comes to your trees.

One of the first decisions is determining which trees are to be preserved and which should be removed. Consider the size, species, maturity, location and condition of each tree. The largest, most mature trees are not always the best to preserve. Younger, more vigorous trees can usually survive and adapt to the stresses of construction better. Try to maintain diversity of species and ages. A certified arborist can advise on which trees are more sensitive to compaction, grade changes, and root damage. Consider the following factors when deciding which trees to preserve:

• Life expectancy and present age
• Health and disease susceptibility
• Structure
• Cleanliness
• Aesthetic values
• Comfort
• Wildlife
• Adaptability to the proposed development
• Survival needs of the tree
• Relationship to other trees

A tree preservation plan must be prepared which includes the tree inventory and tree
protection measures for the project. This should be separate from a landscape plan.

Planting new trees in the right spaces will help to establish the trees’ longevity and
continued health while maximizing their benefits to the site. Consult Top Tree LLC when selecting a species. Many factors influence the suitability of specific species to specific sites.
• Native Species
• Approved plantings
• Tree Function
• Tree Form and Size

We will continue this series over the next few months covering a wide array of topics. Don’t forget, when you’re looking for the best tree maintenance company in Benton City, we’d love the chance to earn your business.

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We are in the middle of a beautiful summer season and this is when we see more and more people out in their yards taking care of their trees, shrubs, and other greenery. We think it’s a good time to go over some “best practices when it comes to your trees.

Site Planning for Preservation
Tree preservation should be considered when creating a site plan. A tree survey that
identifies species, age, location, and health will help determine the best site layout. Once
a tree survey has been completed, the following criteria should be considered to ensure
successful preservation:

  • Critical areas such as floodplains and steep slopes should be left in their natural condition.
  • Roadways should be positioned away from valuable stands, and along original contours to minimize cuts and fills. Cuts and fills present one of the most common causes of tree mortality on construction sites.
  • Utilities should be positioned away from the Tree Protection Zone. Utilities located in the same
    trench can minimize root damage from trenching.
  • Parking and storage should be away from the Tree Protection Zone.
  • Erosion and sediment control measures should be located at the limits of clearing
    and grading to avoid sediment deposition within the Tree Protection Zone’s of preserved trees.

When planning sediment basins, retention basins, or ponds, avoid locations
requiring extensive grading and tree removal. Trenchless silt fence construction
should be used in Critical Root Zone / Tree Protection Zone area.

An inventory of all trees on the site must be conducted, including:

  • A visual assessment (photos) of the trees for health and condition.
  • Recommendations on which trees should be preserved.
  • Construction management recommendations regarding tree protection for trees identified to be preserved.

We will continue this series over the next few months covering a wide array of topics. Don’t forget, when you’re looking for the best tree maintenance company in West Richland, we’d love the chance to earn your business.

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We are in the middle of a beautiful summer season and this is when we see more and more people out in their yards taking care of their trees, shrubs, and other greenery. We think it’s a good time to go over some “best practices when it comes to your trees.

Surface impacts:

  • Wind damage: Trees develop strong anchorage only where it is needed, so trees in groups may have less secure anchorage. Removing some trees from a group will expose the remaining trees to excessive wind velocities and lead to windthrown trees.
  • Excessive pruning: Trees are pruned to prevent damage to utility wires and buildings, but careless pruning can cause tree death. When too many branches are removed or the branches have been pruned improperly, the tree may not be able to sustain itself or may experience decay.
  • Physical injury to trunk and crown: Construction equipment can injure the aboveground portion of a tree by breaking branches, tearing the bark, and wounding the trunk. These injuries are permanent and, if extensive, can be fatal.
  • Root zone impacts: Raising the grade can interfere with gas exchange and suffocate roots, and can also raise the water table and drown the roots.
  • Lowering the grade removes topsoil and feeder roots, exposing the other roots to drying and freezing. Lowering the grade can also lower the water table and cause drought.
  • Compacting the soil within the drip line blocks air and water from the roots.
  • Chemicals dumped in the soil can change soil chemistry and can be toxic to trees.
  • Cutting of roots: The roots of the tree are found mostly in the upper six to twelve inches of the soil.

In a mature tree, the roots extend far from the trunk – typically growing a distance of one to three times the height of the tree. The amount of damage a tree can suffer from root loss depends, in part, on how close to the tree the cut is made. Severing one major root can cause the loss of five to twenty percent of the root system. Trenching and excavating in the root zone can damage as much as forty percent of the root system, causing tree death within a few years.

Trees can require several years to adjust to injury and environmental changes that occur during construction. Stressed trees are more prone to health problems such as disease and insect infestation. Consulting with an arborist about continued maintenance of trees is essential, along with continued monitoring and periodic evaluation for declining health and safety hazards.

We will continue this series over the next few months covering a wide array of topics. Don’t forget, when you’re looking for the best tree maintenance company in Pasco, we’d love the chance to earn your business.

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We are in the middle of a beautiful summer season and this is when we see more and more people out in their yards taking care of their trees, shrubs, and other greenery. We think it’s a good time to go over some “best practices when it comes to your trees.

Preservation Planning

Tree Preservation Wooded areas are preferred sites for residential development due to the aesthetic and environmental value of the trees, which can raise property values by as much as twenty percent. As such valuable sites, wooded lands are being rapidly developed as cities and suburbs expand. This development reduces the environmental and aesthetic benefits to the greater community.

Tree preservation is preferred to replacement, as a new tree requires twenty to thirty years to provide significant aesthetic, infrastructure, and environmental benefits. Unfortunately, trees are subject to many potentially deadly stresses during construction. Construction activity can cause tree death during a project or tree decline over several years, when the cause may not be as obvious. Trees must be carefully protected throughout the site development process to prevent damage.

How trees are damaged during construction surface and root zone impacts on construction sites can disrupt a tree’s interaction with its environment, leading to tree damage or death. Understanding these impacts and their severity is critical to successful preservation.

We will continue this series over the next few months covering a wide array of topics. Don’t forget, when you’re looking for the best tree maintenance company in Richland, we’d love the chance to earn your business.

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We are in the middle of a beautiful summer season and this is when we see more and more people out in their yards taking care of their trees, shrubs, and other greenery. We think it’s a good time to go over some “best practices when it comes to your trees.

Common Definitions

Arborist: A specialist in the care of individual trees. Arborists are knowledgeable about the needs of trees and are trained and equipped to provide proper care. Top Tree LLC is a company who has employees who have achieved a level of knowledge in the art and science of tree care through at least three years of experience and have passed a comprehensive examination. We are also required to continue their education in order to maintain their certification, ensuring that their knowledge is updated on the latest arboriculture techniques.

Street Trees: Large canopy trees planted along existing or proposed public streets. Street trees may be within existing or proposed rights-of-way, but when outside of the public right of way, must be within fourteen feet of the edge of such rights-of-way.

Tree Canopy or Tree Cover: All areas of coverage by plant material exceeding five feet in height, and the extent of planted tree canopy at ten or twenty years maturity.

Tree Protection Zone: Area surrounding individual trees or groups of trees to remain during construction, and defined by fencing and signage as described below unless otherwise indicated. The Tree Protection Zone is 1.5 feet away in radial distance from the tree trunk for every inch in stem diameter. This area is also referred to as the critical root zone or critical root radius.

We will continue this series over the next few months covering a wide array of topics. Don’t forget, when you’re looking for the best tree maintenance company in Kennewick, we’d love the chance to earn your business.

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We are in the middle of a beautiful summer season and this is when we see more and more people out in their yards taking care of their trees, shrubs, and other greenery. We think it’s a good time to go over some “best practices when it comes to your trees.

Best Management Practices Best management practices are technically correct and widely accepted dynamic practices and standards used by professional arborists, urban and community foresters, landscape architects and other tree care and landscape professionals. The goal of the best management practice is to provide basic and practical information on how to best accomplish the most important tree management activities. As standards and practices are updated, best management practice should also be updated to reflect the progression of the green industry in sustainable urban forestry and landscape management.

Introduction

Trees improve a community’s quality of life by providing environmental and aesthetic benefits such as shade, cooling, and wildlife habitat. Our urban trees are part of our infrastructure and are a valuable asset. Unlike other assets, however, trees are living entities and have basic biological requirements for survival and growth. As such, this unique asset must be actively managed and protected to maintain its health, function, safety, and aesthetic value. Man-made landscapes and our everyday lives keep us in close proximity with trees, recognizing their value as a community resource. This proximity may create conflict, especially in land preparation for construction. Keeping construction activities and trees separated is the easiest and most cost-efficient means to prevent undue stress and damage to such trees. Most trees will survive construction activity if kept separated from equipment, materials and trash. For best results, all phases of construction need to include procedures for the protection of trees. This handbook is to serve as a reference for tree preservation, transplanting and tree removal.

We will continue this series over the next few months covering a wide array of topics. Don’t forget, when you’re looking for the best tree maintenance company in the Tri-Cities, we’d love the chance to earn your business.

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We’re now in the season of lawn maintenance and tree maintenance here in Benton City. There are so many possibilities of how to plant, shape, and maintain your yard and the trees and shrubbery in them. If you have questions about trees, we are an excellent resource. We are fully accredited arborists in Benton City and there are only a handful of us here in the area.

Here are some of the more common questions we receive:

  • There is construction going on near my trees, should I be concerned? Yes, it is important to protect tree roots.
  • How do I prune fruit trees? Fruit tree pruning involves using different techniques than you would usually use on landscape trees, in order to encourage fruit production and make it easier to pick.
  • The utility company pruned the trees on my street, and now they look ugly – is there a better solution? We enjoy the benefits of trees, but we also need safe reliable delivery of electricity.
  • Your utility has a tough job making trees and utility lines co-exist. While they should prune to correct standards, some trees under power lines really are better off being removed and replaced with a better tree.

Moving Forward
We look forward to helping you with all of your tree removal, tree trimming needs, and preventative maintenance needs. When and if you have any questions about your trees, shrubs, or any other greenery on your property, we can help. We strive to be your only and best option for tree pruners in Benton City.

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We’re now in the season of lawn maintenance and tree maintenance here in West Richland. There are so many possibilities of how to plant, shape, and maintain your yard and the trees and shrubbery in them. If you have questions about trees, we are an excellent resource. We are fully accredited arborists in West Richland and there are only a handful of us here in the area.

Here are some of the more common questions we receive:

  • The roots of my tree keep coming up in my yard and I run over them with the lawnmower. Can I do anything about this? While you can remove small roots, be careful not to injure the tree. Better yet, make a bigger mulch circle.
  • I think that tree roots have broken into my sewer line. What should I do? Roots will most certainly take advantage of any existing break, crack, or separation in a line of sewer pipe, but they can’t initiate a break. The problem is with your pipes, not the tree. You might try a copper sulfate treatment.
  • My tree looks sick, what can I do? Contact us!

Moving Forward
We look forward to helping you with all of your tree removal, tree trimming needs, and preventative maintenance needs. When and if you have any questions about your trees, shrubs, or any other greenery on your property, we can help. We strive to be your only and best option for tree pruners in West Richland.

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We’re now in the season of lawn maintenance and tree maintenance here in Richland. There are so many possibilities of how to plant, shape, and maintain your yard and the trees and shrubbery in them. If you have questions about trees, we are an excellent resource. We are fully accredited arborists in Richland and there is only a handful of us here in the area.

Here are some of the more common questions we receive:

Is it safe for a homeowner to stand on a ladder and run a chainsaw? Basically, no – you should call in a professional.

Should I use tree wound paint after I make a pruning cut? No, tree wound paint has no benefit to the tree and could inhibit the tree’s recovery from the pruning wounds. My tree is too big for me to prune myself, how can I find a good arborist? Only hire someone who is a Certified Arborist, like us.

Moving Forward
We look forward to helping you with all of your tree removal, tree trimming needs, and preventative maintenance needs. When and if you have any questions about your trees, shrubs, or any other greenery on your property, we can help. We strive to be your only and best option for an arborist in Richland.

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We’re now in the season of lawn maintenance and tree maintenance here in Pasco. There are so many possibilities of how to plant, shape, and maintain your yard and the trees and shrubbery in them. If you have questions about trees, we are an excellent resource. We are fully accredited arborists in Pasco and there are only a handful of us here in the area.

Here are some of the more common questions we receive:

  • My tree is too big, should I “top” it? No, topping is one of the worst things you can do to a tree – it will only make the tree more hazardous.
  • When should I prune my trees and how do I do it? The best time to prune hardwood trees is when they are dormant. Some flowering trees you may want to prune right after flowering. Conifers may be pruned any time of year, but pruning during the dormant season may minimize sap and resin flow from cut branches.
  • My tree was damaged in a storm. Can I save it? Maybe; it depends on the age of the tree and the extent of the damage. The best thing is to not make matters worse by pruning it incorrectly.

Moving Forward
We look forward to helping you with all of your tree removal, tree trimming needs, and preventative maintenance needs. When and if you have any questions about your trees, shrubs, or any other greenery on your property, we can help.We strive to be your only and best option for arborists in Pasco.

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